Someplace to stash my stuff
cos I don't know what the frack I'm doing
Published on March 25, 2013 By starkers In Personal Computing

Okay, so my line in and router is downstairs where our main PCs are, and I want to connect various devices to a wired connection upstairs. Thing is, networking is not my thing and I'm not sure how to go about it.  I did a search and got a whole lot of gobbledygook I could make neither head nor tail of...and pages of sites wanting to sell me shit.  Maybe I wasn't asking the right questions.

Anyway, I have an ethernet cable running from the router to upstairs and a net enabled media player is connected to it thus far.  However, I want to be able to connect the TV, Bluray player, PVR, 2 PC's and the media player all at once.  Now I read something about each device having its own IP address and needing its own ethernet cable to function properly, so can I use a multi-port network switch [see link] at the end of the existing cable to connect the additional devices without confusing/jumbling the signals?

From what I've read it seems so, but I'm not sure. I also read something about using another router as an access point, but that seems rather more complicated and I'm confuseded enough already.

Here's some info regarding the network switch....

Overview

The FS600 Series delivers maximum performance to your home network

  • Links up to 5 or 8 PCs or peripherals to your Ethernet network
  • Connects network devices at 10 or 100 Mbps
  • Plug-and-play installation delivers ease of use
  • Silently runs without a fan

Features

  • 5- or 8-port Fast Ethernet switch instantly expands your network
  • Link up to 5 or 8 PC or Ethernet devices with a fast, auto-switching Ethernet connection
  • Supports Windows® and Macintosh® platforms at speeds of up to 10 or 100 Mbps over Ethernet cables†
  • Every port automatically senses the right speed and full/half duplex mode
  • AutoUplink™ technology adjusts for two major types of connection cables
  • Embedded plug-and-play technology—simply turn it on and it works
  • Sleek, compact design

Key Applications

  • Multiple PCs connecting to the Internet
  • Multiple applications running simultaneously—downloads, voice, music, VoIP
  • Multiplayer gaming over the home network
  • Multimedia/video streaming within the home
  • Networked or shared storage/large file sharing.

 

Hopefully that info helps... and TIA for all and any help offered.


Comments (Page 2)
on Apr 01, 2013

Thanks for the replies, folks, I appreciate it...  I've gained some useful information

Anyhow, seeing as the Netgear DG834G is likely to be a problem for its intended use, I have decided to purchase another 8 port switch for downstairs.  I mean, it's only 25 bucks and no trouble to configure. 

I set up the wireless range extender so we can use our tablets and phones upstairs at the other end of the house and we're constantly getting 4 - 5 bars, whereas before we were lucky to get 2 or 3.  That is a big improvement.

on Apr 01, 2013

Glad you're good to go, NORAD. 

on Apr 05, 2013

I see that most have answered your direct questions, I will throw some more things out there for you.

 

Instead of running wires all over the place (My wife made me pick up all my wires), look at using existing wires to connect to your hub/switch or wireless.

 

Wireless you can buy a wireless bridge that a wire form the TV runs to and then connects wirelessly to your WAP.  (so the bridge sits next to your TV)  Not bad if they are in close proximity (wireless signals lose strength fast).

 

Or try Powerline Ethernet.  Use your electrical system to carry the signals.  The initial cost of that is a bit more than the wireless bridge (given you have to buy 2 initially), but if you have 3 or more devices to connect (and do not want to run wires), it becomes very economical.

 

The best thing is most of these things are dumb - which means plug and play.  At worse, you have to connect the bridge to your WAP much the way you would any other device.  But they basically are just dumb forwarders to your intelligent device.

on Apr 05, 2013

Get a WD Livewire setup, same as Powerline. Amazon has it for 60USD. Hook it up to your main router and plug it into the wall electric socket. Hook the second unit (it comes with 2)into the plug and run up to 4 eithernet cables  to whatever you want to hook up. I've got 3 sets of these in my house and they work great. No set up, just plug it in.

on Apr 06, 2013

Dr Guy

I see that most have answered your direct questions, I will throw some more things out there for you.

 

Instead of running wires all over the place (My wife made me pick up all my wires), look at using existing wires to connect to your hub/switch or wireless.

 

Wireless you can buy a wireless bridge that a wire form the TV runs to and then connects wirelessly to your WAP.  (so the bridge sits next to your TV)  Not bad if they are in close proximity (wireless signals lose strength fast).

 

Or try Powerline Ethernet.  Use your electrical system to carry the signals.  The initial cost of that is a bit more than the wireless bridge (given you have to buy 2 initially), but if you have 3 or more devices to connect (and do not want to run wires), it becomes very economical.

 

The best thing is most of these things are dumb - which means plug and play.  At worse, you have to connect the bridge to your WAP much the way you would any other device.  But they basically are just dumb forwarders to your intelligent device.

Thanks Dr G.  I do have a wireless extender for in the bedrooms, where signals were weak and wired connections would have been a problem with tripping and such.

For the TV and media player, however, I prefer a wired connection for video streaming from downstairs, given that wireless signals can break up, etc.  The cable running from the router is pretty much concealed and emerges just behind the entertainment unit, so it is not an eyesore or a tripping hazard and provides good, strong signals to my upstairs devices.

Essentially, then, I have my home network up and running, and at little expense, too... a 10m cable and a wired extender = 35 bucks. I already had the rest laying around... I fix their rigs so family and friends bring me stuff they no longer want or need.

Kinger

Get a WD Livewire setup, same as Powerline. Amazon has it for 60USD. Hook it up to your main router and plug it into the wall electric socket. Hook the second unit (it comes with 2)into the plug and run up to 4 eithernet cables  to whatever you want to hook up. I've got 3 sets of these in my house and they work great. No set up, just plug it in.

I looked into the WD Livewire setup and thought it a good idea, but I already had most of what I needed so couldn't justify the cost at this time.  However, it will be  consideration if I ever need to upgrade the network

on Apr 06, 2013

Cheaper is always a better solution as long as it works.